Microalgae developed in wastewater retain large amounts of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins suitable for energy production, without a biomass ...

Microalgae developed in wastewater retain large amounts of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins suitable for energy production, without a biomass limit or transformation. Scientists at the National University of Mexico (UNAM) tell us that they can produce biofuel in three hours. A research conducted using academic exchanges with students of the Engineering Institute at UNAM and the University of Newcastle was developed from the sampling of mixed microalgae: Chlorella, Scenedesmus and Desmodesmus native to the Lake of Texcoco. In the generation of biodiesel, about 45 percent of the energy is used in harvesting microalgae, therefore, researchers focus on improving processing operations involved in the transformation to biodiesel. Dr. Sharon Velazquez, expert from the University of Newcastle in the UK, said that "we want to avoid changing the natural environment of microalgae and not introduce genetically modified species. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160427151208.htm